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Wingnut Wings Halberstadt C1.II & RE.8
Includes 2 models; 1x Halberstadt Cl.II Late (33cm x 22cm) & 1x RE.8 "Harry Tate" (40cm x 26cm) - 2 high quality Cartograf decal sheets with markings for Halberstadt Cl.II 15342/17 “III” from Royal Prussian Schlasta 13 and RE.8 “Harry Tate” D4689 “P” of 3 Squadron Australian Flying Corps including 5 colour lozenge camouflage - 496 high quality injection moulded plastic parts - Highly detailed 180hp Daimler-Mercedes D.IIIa & 150hp RAF 4a engines - 18 photo-etched metal detail parts - Fine in scale rib tape detail- Full rigging diagrams.
 

Wingnut Wings Gotha G.1
Although built in very limited numbers, the highly distinctive twin engine Gotha G.1 is nevertheless an important aircraft as it set Gothaer Waggonfabrik on the path to building the more conventional bombers that they became famous for. The aircraft that would serve as the prototype Gotha G.1 was designed by Oskar Ursinus (the founder and editor of Flugsport magazine) to the German Army"s Type III aircraft specifications for a 200hp, 3 seater able to fly at over 120kph and carry 450kg for up to 6 hours. Ursinus proposed the idea of building his Kampfflugzeug (battle plane) to Fliegerersatz Abteilung 3 (FEA 3) commander Major Friedel in August 1914 with construction beginning the following month utilizing FEA 3 personnel. The Friedel-Ursinus “FU” Kampfflugzeug, having now been given the serial number B.1092/14, took to the air at the end of January 1915. The high position of the partially armoured fuselage (intended to provide protection during aerial duels) allowed the two 100hp Daimler-Mercedes D.1 engines to be placed as close together as possible to reduce the yaw effect following an engine failure and offered great visibility, but provided no protection to the crew in the event of a nose over crash. Additionally it was considered to be underpowered and the fuselage design was considered weak. After further evaluation and minor changes, “FU” B.1092/14 was sent to the eastern front for operational trials.  

 

The license to build the “FU” Kampfflugzeug was allocated to Gothaer Waggonfabrik in March 1915 with an initial production order for 6 aircraft placed the following month (numbers 9/15 to 14/15). The main changes incorporated into the new Gotha Grossflugzeug 1 (G.1) included engines of 150-160hp, nearly equal span wings, bomb carrying capacity, wheel type control column and a modified tailplane. To facilitate transport by rail, the fuselage could be disassembled into 3 sections which did nothing to help with structural rigidity. The initial production prototype aircraft, Gotha G.1 9/15, was completed in July 1915 and powered by two 160hp Daimler-Mercedes D.III engines but the remaining 5 aircraft received 150hp Benz Bz.III engines (as found in this model kitset) and were completed over the following couple of months. The 2nd production order for another 6 aircraft was placed in July 1915 (numbers 40/15 to 45/15), all of which received 150hp Benz Bz.III engines and a 2nd gunner"s position. Photographic evidence indicates that surviving initial production aircraft were modified to include this 2nd machine gun position. This was about the same time that early Fokker Eindeckers began appearing at the front which immediately proved that lightweight single seat aircraft were much more suited to aerial fighting than large multiseat Kampfflugzeug designs like the G.1. This resulted in the 3rd and final production order aircraft placed in October 1915 (numbers 100/15 to 105/15) having a greater emphasis placed on carrying bombs and less on armour plating. These 6 aircraft were all powered by 160hp Daimler-Mercedes D.III engines. The fast progressing development of combat aircraft meant that the G.1 was considered obsolete shortly after entering service and almost all of them had been retired from front line service by February 1916. One Benz Bz.III powered G.1 was modified with a lowered fuselage, necessitating a narrower nose bottom profile to clear the propellers and was fitted with modest anti-nose-over skids. A single Gotha UWD (Ursinus Wasser Doppeldecker) seaplane version was completed in late 1915 and served until October 1916 when it was destroyed in a crash. Any history of these interesting aircraft here is of necessity very brief, therefore we encourage you to seek out the references mentioned below for a more thorough understanding.     

 

WW1 colour schemes are contentious at the best of times and we have done our best to provide what we consider to be accurate painting information for this model. Photographic evidence shows that the fuselage fabric, wings and tailplane of the Gotha G.1 was opaque (not translucent as would be expected for clear doped linen) and appears to have been finished in all over field grey. At least one aircraft, 11/15, had its underside repainted at unit level in a pale colour, probably light blue. Metal brackets, cowlings, panels and struts appear to have been painted a very very light grey, almost white, along with some exterior wooden components. The wooden interior appears to have been darkly varnished or painted in a dark colour, possibly field grey. The various camouflage schemes applied to German aircraft of the Great War have attracted more than their fair share of debate over the years and, while we have been as meticulous as we could be, I’m sure some will not find our choices to their liking and impassioned debate will continue to rage on amongst modellers.


Wingnut Wings Gotha UWD

The unique German seaplane was developed from the Gotha G.1 land plane and although only one was ever built, the highly distinctive twin engined Gotha UWD is nevertheless important because it helped set Gothaer Waggonfabrik on the path to building the more conventional seaplanes and bombers that they became famous for. The aircraft that would serve as the prototype Gotha G.1 was designed by Oskar Ursinus (the founder and editor of Flugsport magazine) to the German Army"s Type III aircraft specifications of a 200hp, 3 seater able to fly at over 120kph and carry 450kg for up to 6 hours. Ursinus proposed the idea of building his Kampfflugzeug (battle plane) to FEA 3 commander Major Friedel in August 1914. The distinctive high fuselage allowed the two 100hp Daimler-Mercedes D.1 engines to be placed as close together as possible to minimize yaw effects should one engine fail. Construction began the following month utilizing Flieger-Ersatz-Abteilung 3 (FEA 3) personnel and the Friedel-Ursinus Kampffugzeug “FU”, having now been given the serial number B.1092/14, took to the air at the end of January 1915. The high position of the partially armour plated fuselage offered great visibility but provided little protection to the crew in the event of a nose over crash. Additionally the fuselage design was considered weak and it was considered to be underpowered. After further evaluation and minor changes “FU” B.1092/14 was sent to the eastern front for operational trials. 

 

The license to build the “FU” Kampfflugzeug was allocated to Gothaer Waggonfabrik in March 1915 and incorporated many changes including 160hp Daimler-Mercedes D.III and 150hp Benz Bz.III engines, nearly equal span wings, bomb carrying capacity, wheel type control column and a modified tailplane. The initial production orders for 6 Gotha G.1 land based aircraft and 1 Ursinus Wasser Doppeldecker (UWD) seaplane were placed in April 1915. To facilitate transport by rail, the fuselage could be disassembled into 3 sections which did nothing to help with structural rigidity. There would only be 18 Gotha G.1 built in total because the fast progressing development of combat aircraft meant that it was considered obsolete shortly after entering service in July and almost all of them had been retired from front line service by February 1916. The UWD was one of several different twin engine seaplanes ordered by the Navy to fit their requirements for a long range reconnaissance and torpedo carrying aircraft. The sole UWD was completed in late December 1915 and given the Naval serial number 120. UWD 120 initially featured an upside down tailplane but this is conspicuously absent from photos taken during its testing at Warnemünde in January and February 1916, having now been re-installed the “right way up”. The UWD was described as easy to fly, able to take to the air with ease and was smooth on landing. Sometime after passing its testing phase, UWD 120 had a “proboscis” bomb dropping tube fixed under its nose, additional windows installed and balanced ailerons fitted. There is currently no evidence to suggest that UWD 120 was ever used to carry a torpedo. Gotha UWD 120 was used to bomb the English coast during 1916 and continued to serve the Navy until it was written off in a crash on 2 October that year. Any history of this interesting aircraft here is of necessity very brief, therefore we encourage you to seek out the references mentioned below for a more thorough understanding.         

 

WW1 colour schemes are contentious at the best of times and we have done our best to provide what we consider to be accurate painting information for this model. Photographic evidence shows that the fuselage linen, wings and tailplane of the UWD was opaque (not translucent) and appears to have been finished in all over field grey. The wooden nose and floats appear to have been painted with a black bituminous tar based transparent varnish for protection. The cockpit top coaming and rear section of the fuselage appear to have been finished similarly, although these may have simply been overpainted with a darker version of field grey. All metal brackets, cowlings, panels and struts appear to have been painted a very very light grey, almost white colour. The interior wooden parts appear to have been darkly varnished. The various camouflage schemes applied to German aircraft of the Great War have attracted more than their fair share of debate over the years and, while we have been as meticulous as we could be, I’m sure some will not find our choices to their liking and impassioned debate will continue to rage on amongst modellers.

Latest


Tamiya Lockheed P-38F-G Lightning 1:48

This WWII fighter was a daring design with twin booms and a piston engine in each, plus a central nacelle which housed the cockpit and armament (machine guns and cannon in the nose). Introduced in June 1941, the aircraft went on to be used extensively in the Pacific through WWII. The F variant was manufactured from April 1942 onward, and featured pylons for 150-gallon drop tanks to make it capable of longer bombing missions. Later P-38Gs had more powerful engines and could carry bigger 300-gallon drop tanks. The P-38 was used for interception, dive bombing, level bombing, ground attack, night fighting, photo reconnaissance, radar and visual pathfinding for bombers and evacuation missions, and extensively as a long-range escort fighter when equipped with drop tanks under its wings.

• 1/48 scale plastic model assembly kit. Fuselage length: 240mm, wingspan: 330mm.
• P-38F and P-38G variants can be built.
• The model creates a parked aircraft when assembled and complete.
• Features accurate depictions of early P-38 features such as slimline engine cowlings, intercoolers in leading edges, plus the curved canopy front.
• Weights are included in the kit to ensure correct balance of the model when displayed.
• The canopy can be assembled open or closed. When closed, it is a 1-part slide-molded piece with dedicated F and G variant parts. The hatch is shown open sideways on the P-38F, and vertically on the P-38G.
• A detailed cockpit features the wheel-type controls, radio, throttle box and more.
• Comes with parts to recreate two each of 150- and 300-gallon drop tanks.
• Includes two marking options: “White 147” P-38G which took part in the interception of Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto in April 1943 and “White 33” P-38F.
• Mirror stickers are included to recreate cockpit mirror and engine cowling interior surface sections.
• Comes with canopy masking stickers and a full-color painting guide.


Wingnut Wings Hannover Cl.II (early) 1:32

Relatively simple rigging - 3 high quality Cartograf decal sheets including fitted 4 & 5 colour lozenge and markings for 5 aircraft - 261 high quality injection moulded plastic parts - 16 photo-etched metal detail parts - Highly detailed 23 part Argus As.III engine with optional propellers - Optional wireless, flares, radiators, cameras, teddy bear and diorama accessories - Included one late production colour scheme for modellers uncomfortable with complicated lozenge camouflage finishes - Fine in scale rib tape detail - Full rigging diagrams. 

The highly distinctive Hannover Cl.II was an excellent low level two-seat escort fighter and ground attack aircraft. Hannoversch Waggonfabrik AG (Hawa) manufactured railway carriages before branching out and building aircraft under license for Aviatik, Rumpler and Halberstadt. Hawa delivered their first license built aircraft in early 1916 but by the end of that year they had begun to design their own aircraft to Idflieg’s new lightweight C class (C = armed two-seat) specifications. The result was the Hannover Cl.II (the ‘l’ stands for leicht - lightweight) prototype which first flew in July 1917 with production aircraft reaching front line units the following month. Powered by a 180hp Argus As.III engine, the new ‘battle plane’ was well received; it was strong, fast, light weight and in certain circumstances could outmaneuver allied fighters. The high position of the crew gave them an excellent field of vision unobstructed by the top wing, and the innovative biplane tailplane increased the observer’s field of fire rearwards. Depending on mission requirements the Hannover Cl.II could carry various models of camera and wireless equipment as well as small bombs.

 

The unusually deep Hannover Cl.II wooden frame fuselage was skinned with 1.6mm plywood (thinner than the fuselage wall thickness of this model) and then given a layer of doped on fabric for additional strength. But the most distinctive feature of the Cl.II was the biplane horizontal tailplanes. The wing panels were of conventional construction being made of wood and covered in fabric while the elevators, ailerons and top horizontal tailplane were constructed from welded steel tubing covered in fabric. The top wing center section and the bottom horizontal tailpane were constructed from wood like the wings but were skinned with 1.6mm plywood. The wing and undercarriage struts were steel tubes with wooden fairings wrapped in fabric.

 

A lightened and strengthened version powered by the coveted 180hp Daimler-Mercedes D.IIIa engine, the Hannover Cl.III, was put into production in January 1917. A mere 80 aircraft had been manufactured before production was switched back to the Argus As.III engine later that month because the Daimler-Mercedes D.IIIa power plant was urgently required. These lightened aircraft powered by the Argus As.III became the Hannover Cl.IIIa. Although the Hannover Cl.III and Cl.IIIa featured a shorter wingspan and narrower fuselage, along with several small external differences, they looked for all intents and purposes exactly the same as the Cl.II, making identification very difficult for the uninitiated. Although the Cl.II was gradually replaced by the improved Cl.III & Cl.IIIa from the middle of 1918 they continued to serve at the front until the armistice. Additionally 200 Cl.II were manufactured by Roland during 1918 which primarily served with training units. A few Hannover Cl.II and Cl.IIIa continued to serve post war in the Polish and Latvian air services. Any history here is of necessity very brief so for a better understanding of this important aircraft we encourage you to seek out the references mentioned below.

 

WW1 colour schemes are contentious at the best of times and we have done our best to provide what we consider to be accurate painting information for this model. The various camouflage schemes and personal markings applied to German aircraft of the Great War have attracted more than their fair share of debate over the years and, while we have been as meticulous as we could be, I’m sure some will not find our choices to their liking. Hannover Cl.II interior fuselage colours are thought to be dark varnished wood with metal brackets and fittings finished in grey-green. The fabric areas of the wings and tailplane were covered with 4 and 5 colour lozenge with rib tapes cut from the same material or plain linen. The top wing center section, wing struts, ply covered bottom horizontal tailplane and rear of the fuselage were painted to approximate the fabric lozenge shapes and colours using both matt and gloss paints. It appears that larger freehand lozenge patches were hand painted or sprayed over the rest of the fuselage which were in turn frequently oversprayed with camouflage colours to tone them down considerably. Period reports and factory documents refer to Hannover fuselage colours of ‘black’, ‘blue’ and ‘generally dark green’. The use of a transparent dark ‘Prussian blue’ glaze sprayed over the lozenge patches on the fuselage would achieve any, and perhaps all, of these results depending on the intensity of the underlying colours and the opacity of the glaze. Additionally many colourful unit and personal markings were applied, all of which remain amongst the liveliest of topics for modellers to debate.

Wingnut Wings Sopwith Pup Gnome 1:32

The Sopwith Pup was universally liked by the young aviators of the RNAS and RFC charged with flying it. Most Sopwith Pups were powered by a 80hp LeRhone 9c engine (as included in our previous, sold out models, 32013 Sopwith Pup “RFC” & 32016 Sopwith Pup “RNAS”) although many others with fitted with 80hp or 100hp Gnome engines (as supplied in this model) or a Clerget engine. Despite having only one gun, the Pup’s light weight and maneuverability ensured it was a good match for the twin gun armed Albatros D.II, Fokker D.II and Halberstadt fighters it faced in late 1916. At least 29 RFC and RNAS pilots achieved ace status in the Pup with victories claimed over the aforementioned fighters as well as the improved Albatros D.III and D.V, observation balloons, various two seaters, seaplanes and 5 Gotha bombers before being withdrawn from frontline service in the latter stages of 1917.

151
high quality injection moulded plastic parts.
-9 photo-etched metal detail parts.
-2 (two) Gnome engines, 1x 80hp & 1x 100hp, included.    
-Optional side cowls, engine cowls, propellers and Le Prieur rockets.
-24 page fully illustrated instruction manual.
-
High quality Cartograf decals including markings for 5 colour schemes;


Deluxe Materials Wonderfill
Deluxe Materials Wonderfill

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Deluxe Materials View Glue

Deluxe Materials Tricky Stick
Deluxe Materials Tricky Stick

Deluxe Materials Track Magic Accessory Pack
Deluxe Materials Track Magic Accessory Pack

Deluxe Materials Track Magic
Deluxe Materials Track Magic

Deluxe Materials Tissue Paste
Deluxe Materials Tissue Paste

Deluxe Materials Tacky Wax
Deluxe Materials Tacky Wax

Deluxe Materials Super Phatic Glue
Deluxe Materials Super Phatic Glue

Deluxe Materials Super Crylic Adhesive
Deluxe Materials Super Crylic Adhesive

Deluxe Materials Strip Magic
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Deluxe Materials Sticky Mat Adhesive
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Deluxe Materials Speedbond 500g
Deluxe Materials Speedbond 500g

Deluxe Materials Speedbond 112g
Deluxe Materials Speedbond 112g